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Thread: How to polish a Studebaker 20's with original paint

  1. #1
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    How to polish a Studebaker 20's with original paint

    I've had a question about a almost 100 years old car.
    A man in our village came to me if i would treat his car, this car is a Studebaker from the 20's.

    There has been a lot of work to get the car driving, many parts had to be recreated because it is no longer available.
    In a few weeks, the car is ready.

    The paint is still in good condition only is this still very matte and gloss should be brought back.

    What is the best treatment I could perform because this kind of painting, I'm not familiar with it and therefore I ask the question in this topic

    Because the paint is old seems wise not to be rude to go to work, I prever the V-serie.

    I hope someone can give me in this good advice.
    Already thanks for your response and advice.

  2. #2
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    http://youtu.be/TZFEzAaz0ZA

    In this video Greg works on a Mercedes with an older paint job. Older paint is unique because a lot of the companies used a lacquer base. i don't know about the Studebaker, if you could please enclose a picture of the paint, you could try starting with V36 or V38 with a white Hexlogic pad if the paint really looks decent. I would then glaze, seal, and finish with a very nice high quality (Project J97 paste wax). <----- that car deserves it!!!!!!!!!!

  3. #3
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    That old the paint should really respond well to a polish with a lot of oils in it. Gentle of course. A good glaze might be a good idea too. I know the old single stage paints really liked them. I would go with an old fashion carnuba wax to top. Don't disrespect by using some fancy lab made, computer tested sealant.

  4. #4
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    Thanks for Reply.
    I have still got time.
    One thing is sure the car needs a good prepared treatment.

  5. #5
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    Post pics when done!

  6. #6
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    I sure post pics when it's done.
    The engine of the car must first be ready and some other things had to be build of.
    When this all is ready the owner will call me to make an appointment.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shiny Ride Detailing View Post
    I've had a question about a almost 100 years old car.
    A man in our village came to me if i would treat his car, this car is a Studebaker from the 20's.

    There has been a lot of work to get the car driving, many parts had to be recreated because it is no longer available.
    In a few weeks, the car is ready.

    The paint is still in good condition only is this still very matte and gloss should be brought back.

    What is the best treatment I could perform because this kind of painting, I'm not familiar with it and therefore I ask the question in this topic

    Because the paint is old seems wise not to be rude to go to work, I prever the V-serie.

    I hope someone can give me in this good advice.
    Already thanks for your response and advice.
    Sounds like you're going to have fun with this experience. It's not everyday you get to work on an antique car like this. I worked on an old car this past summer that had heavy oxidation that most people wrote off and said it needed to be repainted. It sounds like you don't have an extreme case like I did, but there are steps you should take to protect what little paint may be there.

    I'm guessing the car looks something like this?



    What you want to do is buy an old school glaze product for this old school paint. What was recommended to me was Meguiar’s #7 Show Car Glaze. It's very different from the glazes CG makes. CG's glazes are great for modern paints with clear coat. The Meguiar's was made back in the 1920's for these cars and hasn't really changed over the decades. It contains a lot of oils and that is what you'll need to bring back the initial shine. Then you can reach for the CG polishes recommended. Definitely do a test spot in an inconspicuous area.

    You'll want to hand apply the #7 glaze a couple times before grabbing the polish & machine. You'll need to apply it pretty thick/heavy using a couple terry cloth hand towels as it is the nap, or tiny cotton loops of fiber, that act as your abrasive to chew off the dead oxidized paint while forcing the oils in the #7 into the paint.

    Here's the example:

    Before...



    During #7 application...



    After polishing and wax...



    Make sure you use a light polish and show car wax for dramatic results. And share your pics here.

  8. #8
    That is a beautiful looking car that needs a pretty good finish. We advise you use something like our Cherry Wet Wax to replicate the wet shimmering glow of fresh ripe cherries while also protecting against contamination, pollution and harmful natural elements. Most importantly, it repels UV solar rays that fade and discolor paintwork.

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